The Trust showcased the benefits of its Analytic Command Centre to hundreds of industry thought-leaders, data and analytical experts and leaders from a wide range of industry sectors at the Qlik Data Revolution Tour in Stockholm on Wednesday 6 November.

The Command Centre – a series of screens which show live information about a patient before they enter the Trust’s hospitals, during their stay and when they are discharged home – was created at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT’s) Royal Lancaster Infirmary site. It is part of a different set of activities that have been implemented in the emergency setting to help staff to improve patient management, care and experience.

Rob O’Neill, Head of Information at UHMBT, presented at the one-day event where he also talked about the Trust’s success in using data to underpin care delivery and service transformation.

He also showcased the command centre at Big Data London on Wednesday 13 November which was attended by 3,000 people. There he talked about the benefits of staff being able to see live information which include:

*Which patients are due for discharge and themes of why there may be delays
*The performance in the Emergency Departments which allows staff to see the status of ambulances, the number of walk-ins and if there has been a surge in patients
*The number of admissions to hospital through outpatient appointments and departments such as the Ambulatory Care Unit
*The current bed state across the Trust which helps teams to manage the demand for beds across the hospital and ease the number of patients in ED.

Rob said: “This was a fantastic opportunity to showcase how we have transformed healthcare through data analytics. It was encouraging to have received recognition from industry professionals for our achievements through the Analytic Command Centre and electronic patient record.”

The Trust holds patient flow meetings every two hours in the Analytic Command Centre which helps teams to better analyse the emergency care setting and patient flow in and out of the hospital.

The command centre has been designed to work in a similar way to airport Air Traffic Control and displays live and predictive information about patients throughout their hospital stay, from incoming patients travelling via ambulance to patients waiting for discharge home.

Qlik is a software company founded in 1993 in Lund, Sweden. You can find out more about Qlik at https://www.qlik.com/us

Ask Sami was launched at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT) in 2016 offering support and advice to all members of staff in response to the challenges facing those who needed quick solutions to their day-to-day workforce queries. 

The centralised service uses bespoke call-logging and case management software developed by Thomas Plant, Service Desk Team Leader. Ask Sami also utilises a Workforce Intelligence dashboard which displays live service data and case analytics that was created by Phil Davies and Thomas Timson from the Trust’s BI Development Team. It uses the Qlik platform which the Trust shares with the local Integrated Care Partnership. 

All colleagues can access the Ask Sami team via ‘phone, email or Twitter. Straight-forward queries are resolved right away by a team of Workforce Assistants and more complex matters are escalated to Workforce Advisors. 

 In a recent survey earlier this year, managers praised the service and said that the quick response saves then up to an hour of admin time per week, helping them and their teams focus on patient care and employee wellbeing. 

Christopher Brisley, Acting Workforce Business Partner, UHMBT, said: “We are delighted to accept this award on behalf of the Trust. It reflects not only the hard work of the Ask Sami team but the great relationship we have with our I3 colleagues who worked with us to underpin our service.  This has really transformed the way we handle staff queries.” 

Andy Wicks, Chief Information Officer, UHMBT, said: “This award is a reflection of how technology is helping our staff and transforming the way we work at UHMBT. I have to commend Tom, Phil and Thomas who worked tirelessly to design and support these systems.”

David Wilkinson, Director of People and Organisational Development, added: “Well done to both the Ask Sami and I3 teams who have brought this award home to UHMBT. How Ask Sami uses technology to deliver a great service is testament to the collaboration between the two teams and the synergy between people and technology in helping deliver a great place to work for our colleagues.” 

Last year the Trust triumphed in the Employee Engagement category and was hailed overall winner of the ceremony.  

You can find out more about the Personnel Today awards at https://personneltodayawards.com/ptawards19/en/page/winners-2019 

A new maternity app is empowering pregnant women in North Lancashire and South Cumbria to make informed decisions about their maternity care.

Around 550 women have access to the app, which can be downloaded onto any smartphone device.

Benefits of the app include:

*Access to information on classes and events
*Access to screening information
*Access to pregnancy care plan and tips
*The app can be accessed by mums-to-be anywhere there is Wi-Fi or a data connection
*All the information mums-to-be need is in one place improving security.

There is also a function offering specialist advice for pregnant women who are managing conditions such as diabetes.

Pregnant women can access their maternity notes through a portal system rather than having to ring their midwife to access important information relating to their care – the portal can be accessed through the app or by a separate link and has seen 1,500 pregnant women register so far.

Patient feedback has included:

“Plenty of information and I love the events calendar.”

“It helped me to see all the different information to help me through pregnancy.”

The Trust decided to introduce an app to provide easy access to pregnancy and newborn information for local families. Following the move to paperlite systems it was recognised there was also a need for a replacement of hand-held pregnancy notes. The Trust engaged with the Maternity Voices Partnership (MVP) throughout the process. The MVP is a forum for maternity service users, providers and commissioners of maternity services to come together to design services that meet the needs of local women, parents and families in the Morecambe Bay area.

The creation of the portal for the app has been led by Karen Bridgeman, Digital Midwife, Kat Holmes, Diabetes Specialist Midwife and the Trust’s I3 Department.

Karen Bridgeman said: “The app really does empower women to make informed decisions about what is the best plan for their maternity care. A digital app brings with it a lot of advantages such as reducing the need for duplication and providing numerous leaflets. Access to pregnancy notes reduce the need to carry bulky maternity notes and also improves security as hand-held notes can be lost or stolen.”

Mums-to-be can download the app at the HealthZone UK from iTunes Store/Google Play register. In order to access the maternity notes portal women must provide their community midwife with their email address and consent to the Trust contacting them with an email providing access. More information about how to register and a step-by-step guide can be found at https://www.uhmb.nhs.uk/maternity/about-us/maternity-matters-app/

The pace and scale of digital change at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT) over the past few years has been staggering, transforming both patient care and experience.

Simon Roser is one of seven clinical members of staff who are helping to drive forward UHMBT’s vision that patient care is paper-free from the point of admission to discharge.

Simon started his role as Clinical Prescribing Pharmacist and Pharmacy Lead for IT in 2017. He led on the design and implementation of the Trust’s current online prescribing system ‘Electronic Prescribing Medicines Administration (EPMA)’, which went live across the Trust’s three main hospital sites in April 2018.

“The ability to search our electronic prescribing system via synonym, as well as drug name, has been a game-changer and has helped staff to find medication quicker. It has also reduced the potential risk of prescribing the wrong drug by highlighting which drugs are appropriate for different groups of patients, improving patient safety. Additionally, the inclusion of preconfigured prescribing order sentences has further improved user experience, improved decision support and benefitted patient safety further.” Simon says.

Hundreds of thousands of medicines have been prescribed electronically since the launch of EPMA and it has provided multiple benefits including staff being able to view patients’ electronic records across all three hospital sites and remotely, reducing staff travel time and associated costs to and from the sites which would have occurred when accessing a paper record. Patient safety has also been improved by alerts on the system which flag up when patients have particular allergies and when a patient needs a particular medication dose to avoid missed doses.

Simon adds: “There are so many benefits to electronic prescribing. We can now reuse patient data so clinicians involved in their care can see their previous admission history, and even access their GP records so they can see what medications they are currently taking – staff are not having to ask patients the same questions multiple times so it is also improving patient experience.”

The Trust’s IT systems are now linked better with other health organisations across the bay through systems such as the Analytic Command Centre at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary which is aiding patient flow meetings, giving staff live information of patients throughout their hospital stay, from incoming patients travelling via ambulance to patients waiting for discharge home.

A fundamental moment for the Trust was the introduction of the Lorenzo Electronic Patient Record (EPR) in 2010 and benefits have included:

Around 7,500 users are now on Lorenzo reducing the amount of paper used
More than 80% of outpatient clinics do not need paper notes improving patient care and experience. The EPR flags safeguarding needs for patients who are frequent fallers or have had infections and staff can access a patient’s history meaning they don’t have to ask for the same information twice
The diabetes outpatient department is now 100% paperlite with other services close to this target improving the Trust’s carbon footprint.

Melanie Waszkiel, an Orthoptist, started her role as EPR Clinical Lead 10 years ago and has helped to shape the EPR in outpatients and theatres and the nursing digital record, as well as working with individual departments to help standardise documentation and allow staff easier access to the patient records.

Mel said: “Every day is different, as well as being involved in a number of different projects such as ePrescribing and eRequesting I also work with clinicians to look at how we can move from paper to digital and how we can improve their experience of working digitally which can be a huge change in practice. I am also a Clinical Safety Officer, so I have to assess the risks and issues for every project as well as reviewing any clinical safety issues identified during everyday use of clinical IT systems.

“​I think it is really important to involve clinical staff in shaping the systems – it is a big learning curve for clinical staff to understand the technical aspects as to what can and can’t be done and there are always competing priorities which I think clinical staff need to be involved with. Things have changed since there has been clinical involvement but with an Electronic Patient Record – it is vital for the evolution to involve clinical staff as processes change. When I initially joined there were two clinical staff – we now have seven.”

From nurses carrying out comfort rounds using iPods to midwives using laptops remotely to access the latest information relating to a woman’s care – we can see how firmly embedded technology is within local healthcare.

Karen Bridgeman works closely with the Health Informatics Team to develop the EPR in the maternity setting through her role as Digital Midwife. This change has allowed community midwives to use mobile laptops when they visit a woman, access previous notes and update them there and then.

Karen along with Kathleen Holmes, System Analyst, is also working on a maternity app for the Trust which will allow women to access to pregnancy information and also their pregnancy records in the comfort of their own home without making unnecessary calls and trips to the hospital.

Karen said: “The digital roadmap for maternity is constantly evolving at UHMBT. I am passionate about using technology to make the pregnancy journey easier for women and their families. I also want to be an advocate for the clinicians to ensure the system suits their workflow. Giving women access to their pregnancy notes enables them to be in control of their care and allows them to provide information to other services if they go outside UHMBT. Increasingly we are working closely with the local maternity services (four local trusts) and primary care services to enable sharing of information, with the vision to enable a safer transfer of care across the local trusts. This provides a wider choice of care across the local area.”

Colin Brown, Chief Clinical Information Officer, UHMBT, added: “Having the input of clinical staff is pivotal in order to shape our hospital systems so they work the best that they can for staff to enable them to provide great and safe care for our patients. We have seen some tangible benefits since introducing the EPR which have helped to give our patients a better experience of our hospitals.”

The I3 Department (Informatics, Information and Innovation) from University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT) was presented with an Excellence in Informatics Level 2 Award at the North West Skills Development Network 2019 Connect Conference.

The team is one of eight trusts in the North West who have been accredited with the level 2 award for raising the importance of workforce development in informatics, creating a development culture and sharing good practice across organisations.

The Trust was assessed between September and August 2019.

Andy Wicks, Chief Information Officer, UHMBT, said: “This award is testament to the support of our leaders at UHMBT and the hard work and dedication of my team which they should be extremely proud of.”

The North West’s Skills Development Network’s accreditation scheme, Excellence-in- Informatics, Accrediting your workforce provides a set of standards aimed at promoting the personal and professional development of informatics staff.  The standards address five key areas – infrastructure, personal development and career planning, professional development, workforce planning and people management.

In its assessment, the network’s panel was very impressed by the Trust’s I3 brand and its understanding and engagement with all staff members. The team’s culture to develop and grow was very apparent and the work undertaken on the Training Management System portal was impressive.

Keith Griffiths, Director of Finance, UHMBT, said: “We are extremely proud of our Health Informatics team and clinical staff who are working extremely hard to transform our hospitals, support our GPS, community and local authority teams and empower our patients and their families.”

The annual conference was opened by John Glover, Chief Information Officer and Chair and Chair of Informatics Strategy Group. There were also presentations from a variety of speakers including Patrick Mitchell, Director of Innovation and Transformation Health Education England and Paul Rice, Head of Technology Strategy for NHS England.

The North West Skills Development Network (NWSDN) provides an innovative learning and development infrastructure which enables and supports the continuing development of all finance, informatics, procurement and associated staff in the NHS across the North West. This is in line with the NHS Constitution’s pledge to provide all staff with the right skills to develop excellent professionals enabling them to facilitate the delivery of excellent patient care.

A real-time analytics solution which was created in December 2018 at the Trust’s Royal Lancaster Infirmary site is helping staff to improve patient management, care and experience.

The Analytic Command Centre was designed to work in a similar way to airport air traffic control and displays live information about patients throughout their hospital stay, from incoming patients travelling via ambulance to patients waiting for discharge home.

Watch our staff explain the benefits of the command centre in the following movie by Qlik software company https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYOxCKfq68w&feature=youtu.be

More than 80 per cent of outpatient clinics at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT) do not need paper case notes, thanks to the introduction of the Lorenzo Electronic Patient Record (EPR).

In March 2019 this meant that 26,000 case notes did not have to be transported to clinics across the Trust’s sites.

The outpatient paper-lite project was introduced in April 2013 and has seen benefits in the following areas.

*Multiple members of staff can access up-to-date patient information instantly, at the same time and from anywhere in any of the hospitals
*Staff can access a patient’s history meaning they don’t have to give the same information twice
*It can flag up safeguarding needs for patients who are frequent fallers or have had infections
Staff can easily access treatment policies
*It reduces delays in finding paperwork, improves legibility and limits paper notes lost.

Dr Adrian Brodison, Consultant Cardiologist, UHMBT, said: “Having all of the patient’s clinical information easily available on the computer in a digital format has revolutionised the way UHMBT delivers all clinical care especially in outpatient departments.

“Before the use of the digital record across the board we could not reliably be certain that all the clinical details were present, especially when the patient may be seeing several teams and having admissions concurrently.

“The use of paper notes in years past was very slow especially when the patient had a large volume of notes. For cardiology, in particular, having all our cardiac tests, particularly ECGs, available in a digital format with a non-deteriorating picture resolution has allowed us to make decisions benefiting patient care at the first appointment rather than searching for pieces of paper which often are not immediately available and take an inordinate amount of time to find.”

Sue Smith, Deputy Chief Executive and Executive Chief Nurse, UHMBT, said: “In Morecambe Bay our population is very dispersed and using technology can help us deliver services more effectively, closer to patients and meet patient’s aspirations.

“By introducing the EPR in outpatients, the Trust has not only seen a reduction in paper notes and our carbon footprint but has offered the Trust the opportunity to ensure that critical patient information is presented to the clinician at the right time and the right place.”

Health professionals from the Auckland District Health Board in New Zealand visited University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT) to find out more about the Trust’s Lorenzo Electronic Patient Record (EPR).

The health board has 11,000 health and medical staff and looks after one of the country’s largest public hospitals Auckland City Hospital, as well as Starship Children’s Hospital and Greenlane Clinical Centre. It is looking to implement a faster and more reliable electronic patient record system and was invited to the Trust to see the Lorenzo EPR in action.

The Trust’s Health Informatics team and clinical staff gave visitors a tour of the emergency department and theatres at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary before they enjoyed a presentation on how the EPR has transformed care at UHMBT.

The Trust launched Lorenzo EPR – a quicker and more reliable electronic patient record in April 2018, which has transformed the way the Trust’s hospitals work, providing care that is paperless from the point a patient enters the hospital via the emergency department or outpatient clinic until they are discharged home via an electronic discharge letter.

The Trust has seen benefits in the following areas:

*The Trust’s diabetes outpatient department is 100% paperlite with other services close to this target improving the Trust’s carbon footprint

*More than 80% of outpatient clinics do not need paper notes improving patient care and experience. The EPR flags safeguarding needs for patients who are frequent fallers or have had infections and staff can access a patient’s history meaning they don’t have to ask for the same information twice

*Over 500 GP records are accessed per day via Lorenzo EPR resulting in better-connected care for patients

*Thanks to a series of dashboards, theatre staff across all three main hospitals can view the progress of a theatre session, manage patient lists, allocate teams for specific procedures and identify potential delays in schedules. This gives staff a single platform to carry out theatre check-in, manage anaesthesia and operation details, patient information in recovery and handover to the wards

*There is now greater flexibility for midwives working in the community who can access the latest information relating to a woman’s care remotely through laptops. Midwives are saving travel time as they no longer have to come back to base to enter handwritten notes into the electronic system.

The EPR is also better connected to primary care, social services, the integrated care system (Healthier Lancashire and South Cumbria) and the national system giving staff in our hospitals a better picture of a patient’s medical history and care to date ensuring better patient care, safety and experience.

Shayne Tong, Chief Digital Officer for Auckland District Health Board, thanked Morecambe Bay for being very generous with their time and expertise and that the Auckland team had learned a lot from the visit which would help to inform their planning choices.

Colin Brown, Chief Clinical Information Officer, UHMBT, added: “The EPR has revolutionised the way staff at UHMBT are working and has strengthened the way we work with colleagues in the community. We have seen some tangible benefits since introducing the EPR which have helped to give our patients a better experience of our hospitals.”

Andy Wicks, Chief Information Officer, UHMBT, said: “We were delighted when the Auckland District Health Board expressed an interest in coming to the Trust to find out more about the work we have been doing around the Lorenzo EPR. We hope that by sharing valuable knowledge and experience with the health board that it will aid the growth of the Auckland healthcare IT system.”

An innovative electronic system which allows staff on the wards at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary to order inpatient meals on the same day has reduced food wastage by an average of 49% since it was introduced in July 2018. This equates to a saving of £26,000 – which is a reflection of the Trust’s commitment to saving money and becoming more eco-friendly and efficient.

Before the new system staff would have had to fill in a paper form and take it to catering staff a day in advance – this could mean that if a patient’s appetite changed meals could be wasted.
The system was rolled out at FGH between August and October 2018.

Since the system swap, a staggering 359,819 meals have been ordered on 20 wards at RLI and nine wards at FGH. The old paper process could take ward staff up to one hour 30 minutes to complete – so staff time has also been saved by using the new system.

Jackie O’ Brien, Catering Manager, University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT), said: “The reduction of food wastage has been staggering and something we’re really proud of. The new system has saved time for catering supervisors’ as they no longer have to count meal numbers. The new system does this automatically for them. So they have more time to better provide the services that focus on patient improvements.”

Keith Griffiths, Director of Finance, UHMBT, added: “An astounding 149,267 meals have been ordered, at the Trust since 1 January 2019, using this innovative piece of software, which has reduced the Trust’s carbon footprint and food wastage as well as saving a substantial sum of money – a perfect example of how a sensible change has made a big impact.”

Patient satisfaction has improved thanks to the new system.

Lisa Winn, Ward Manager for the RLI’s Lancaster Suite, UHMBT, added: “Patient care and experience is at the heart of what we do and we’ve had some fantastic feedback from patients on the meals since this system was introduced.

“It’s also provided a fantastic opportunity for staff on the wards to work more closely with other departments, helping provide a highly efficient service, putting the patient at the forefront while creating measurable cost savings.”

A patient on the Lancaster Suite added: “The way you can order your meal is much better now that it’s on an iPad – it felt a bit overwhelming on paper. The quality of the food has always been fantastic at the hospital.”

Staff feedback shaped the design of the app, including having clear deadlines for ordering meals and the ability to order items such as custard separately.

The new ordering system allows meals to ‘follow the patient’ should they be transferred to another ward, as well as providing for swift cancellations if they are discharged.

If a patient is discharged out of hours, a take-home food bag is made available. These bags ensure patients will be able to have food and a hot drink once they arrive home.

The Trust’s Health Informatics team, Foluke Ajayi, Chief Operating Officer, Stuart Hosking-Durn, Head of Resilience and Patient Flow, and Andy Crundell, Matron for the Emergency Department at the RLI were filmed by inEvidence about the benefits of using Qlik software through the Analytic Command Centre.

The final film and case study will be released shortly.

Dr William Lumb, Suzy Foster CEO EMIS Health and Dr Shaun O’Hanlan, Chief medical officer for EMIS Group, visited partners across the bay to view the EMIS system in practice.

The event included a visit to Sedbergh Medical Practice to meet staff and discuss the Bay Health and Care Partners digital strategy, a tour around Westmorland General Hospital to meet services using EMIS Web including Langdales, the Integrated Musculoskeletal Service, district nursing and therapy services.

Our guests also enjoyed a presentation from the Integrated Communities (our Neighbourhoods).

A real-time analytics solution which was created in December 2018 at the Trust’s Royal Lancaster Infirmary site is helping staff to improve patient management, care and experience.

The Analytic Command Centre was designed to work in a similar way to airport air traffic control and displays live information about patients throughout their hospital stay, from incoming patients travelling via ambulance to patients waiting for discharge home.

Improvements so far include:

• The number of patients triaged with the Trust’s Emergency Department within 15 minutes of arrival has risen from 70% in 2018 to 94% for April- June 2019
• The number of nights where a medical patient has been cared for on a non-medical ward due to bed pressure (medical outliers) has decreased by over 1,800 bed-days or 47% between April – June 2018 and April – June 2019.

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT) holds patient flow meetings every two hours in the Analytic Command Centre which helps teams to better analyse the emergency care setting and patient flow in and out of the hospital.

The new screens show live information including:
• Which patients are due for discharge and themes of why there may be delays
• The performance in the Emergency Departments (ED) which allows staff to see the status of ambulances, the number of walk-ins and if there has been a surge in patients
• The number of admissions to hospital through outpatient appointments and departments such as the Ambulatory Care Unit
• The current bed state across the Trust which helps teams to manage the demand for beds across the hospital and ease the number of patients in ED.

Rob O’Neill, Head of Information, UHMBT, added: “Advanced analytics is helping us to deliver the highest standard of patient care as efficiently as possible in this area. By immersing our colleagues in real-time data it gives them the opportunity to pre-empt and react quickly to changing demand.”

‘Foluke Ajayi, Chief Operating Officer, UHMBT, said: “We have seen some fantastic results since the Analytic Command Centre was implemented which is helping our teams to plan ahead with the resources they have to give the very best care to our patients.”

The Trust’s contract with Microsoft Office 2010 is due for renewal by January 2020, so we have decided to opt for a better software package which will improve the security of our systems and boasts more up-to-date features and tools – which will benefit our War on Waste.

We are working hard to ensure all computers and laptops across the Trust are upgraded to Office 365 software and that staff are trained on the new system by 18 November 2019.

As part of the roll-out, we are looking for 613 members of staff to sign up as 365 Champions by Sunday 25 August 2019. That means for every team of 10 people, one person would nominate themselves as a Champion to raise awareness of the benefits of 365 and help and advise their colleagues on the system.

Training will commence for Champions on 30 September 2019 and will run over four weeks. Each session will take approximately two hours and each Champion will be required to attend one session.

We would encourage every care group to come on board with the roll-out and identify Champions in their teams and departments.

Staff can sign up to be a 365 Champion by creating a Microsoft account using your Trust email account. To access the signup form please see the article on the staff intranet Trust news pages.

Features of the new system:

Even though we are switching over to an online system legacy features which you may work closely with such as Word, Excel, OneNote and PowerPoint systems will still be available.

Office 365 boasts exciting programmes such as Microsoft Teams (an online chat forum) which can help to reduce emails, improve communication, team planning, team meetings and much more.

As part of the roll-out, we will have an exciting new intranet through SharePoint and our current g-drive system will also move across.

What staff need to do over the next few months:

As part of the move we would encourage all staff to clean up their email boxes by reducing any unnecessary emails and spam, deleted items and clear deleted folders.

OneDrive is going to replace all users My Documents so it is important users take some time to reduce the size of their OneDrives (My Documents as OneDrive will be completely online).

In the meantime, if you have any concerns or queries please email office365@mbhci.nhs.uk

Tony Stewart
Health Informatics Team

Cathy Rawlings, Midwife at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT), has joined a private ‘Facemums’ group as a moderator ‘Facewife’, where she shares up-to-date evidence-based information, answers queries and signposts women to appropriate local services.

The Facemums service, which is funded by Health Education England (HEE) and coordinated by the University of Salford, is aimed at pregnant women and women up to six weeks postnatal. It gives women a platform to seek information they need and support each other.

The Morecambe Bay group currently has a small group of registered (followers) mothers and mums-to-be, aged between 16 and 28-years-old, between 12-30 weeks gestation.

Cathy, who is based at the South Lakes Birth Centre at Furness General Hospital, said: “I’m really enjoying being part of the group. The group is going well at the moment. The women seem to be enjoying it although they have only just started really chatting in the group this week.

“I think it is definitely something that could coincide with case loading midwifery which is a new model of care supported nationally and sees midwives take on their own group of women and following them all the way through their pregnancy, seeing them in the community for antenatal and postnatal periods, as well as caring for them in labour to ensure continuity of care in the future. I’m excited to see where the Facemums group goes.”

Feedback from users has included:
“I am enjoying it more than ever. Feel it’s a great help, learning lots from the Facewives and other mums and trying to support where I can.”

HEE is supporting the rollout of Facemums following the success of the research project ‘The Impact of Midwife-Moderated Social Media-based Communities on Pregnant Women and New Mothers’, which demonstrated clear benefits to women in three specific areas:
• Support from other women who have experienced what the other is going through which helps to reduce pregnancy-related anxieties
• Midwives providing information and knowledge based on experience and research
• Continuity of care which relates to a patient’s needs.

Sue Smith, OBE, Deputy Chief Executive and Executive Chief Nurse, UHMBT, said: “It is fantastic that pregnant mums and mums who are six weeks postnatal have a place where they can ask any questions they have to professional midwives

“It’s a great way of encouraging peer support, reducing anxiety and isolation felt by many new mums and mums-to-be.”

Women must be over 16 to join. You can find out more about the Facemums group by contacting Amanda Plackett on amanda.plackett@mbht.nhs.uk

Two prestigious visitors from an international benchmarking company visited the Royal Lancaster Infirmary (RLI) on Wednesday 1 May to help improve the user experience of staff on the electronic patient record.

KLAS is a worldwide electronic patient record (EPR) benchmarking company, who are supporting University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT) to improve the EPR experience for its doctors, nurses and Allied Health Professionals.

Jeremy Goff, Senior Researcher, and Professor Rachel Dunscombe, UK KLAS Ambassador, met with Dr Paul Smith and the Health Informatics team to learn about how they were working with clinician users to improve clinical care through better use of digital technology and the EPR.

They then took a tour of the site’s clinical areas, including the Emergency Department and Acute Medical Unit where they spoke to clinicians, nurses and junior doctors about their experience of the system, before meeting up with the team and David Wilkinson, Director of People and Organisational Development, to share highlights from their research.

Colin Brown, Chief Clinical Officer, UHMBT, said: “We were delighted to welcome Jeremy and Professor Dunscombe to the Trust, to showcase what we have done so far.

“It is important to us to improve user experience of the EPR and we are working with the feedback we have had from staff and also the experience and learnings and advice from KLAS, to make user experience even better for them.”

To finish the visit, the pair shared their most recent insights of user experience measurements from some on the 200 trusts and organisations they work with around the world.

The Trust’s Health Informatics Team sent out a KLAS survey in October 2018 to ask users what they thought of the current Lorenzo EPR experience. The Trust’s junior doctors have also collated some useful feedback in recent months. These two sources of feedback have prompted setting up of an EPR User Experience Working Group and an active project, to improve user experience of the EPR.

The Health Informatics team will work fairly rapidly across the sites over the following months, to fix any broken computer kits and upgrade machines to ensure the EPR system runs as smoothly as possible.

They will also look at coaching and upskilling the workforce to be able to use the EPR system better – this will include flexible workplace-based training. They will also work with the partner supplier DXC, to prioritise further key software improvements, to meet the needs of users.

David Wilkinson, Director of People and Organisational Development, UHMBT, said: “Working with KLAS is really useful – the insights from their research will help us to improve how colleagues use digital technology across UHMBT, which has been identified as a high priority area for our colleague experience strategy.”

The Information Sharing Gateway (ISG) led by University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT), was first developed in 2014 in partnership with 10 other public sector organisations in Cumbria and Lancashire.

The system has many benefits including:

  • Reducing the paper processes that organisations used previously
  • Greater security in line with General Protection Data Regulation (GPDR), privacy and data protection laws
  • The ability to manage risks around data sharing
  • Templates and common standards of working.

Nicola Briggs, ISG Programme Manager at UHMBT, said: “We aspire to deliver the benefits derived from using the system to as many people across the UK in a bid to support a joined up and more effective data sharing community.

“The ISG is a digitally collaborative way of working which organisations can contribute to the drawing up of agreements, risk assess and agree and sign them electronically.

“The ISG provides a simple answer to a big challenge for organisations trying to overcome information governance requirements when sharing information.”

Phillipa Nazari, Data Protection Officer and Head of Information Governance for Greater Manchester Combined Authority, said: “Greater Manchester (GM) is reforming public services and this reform needs to be insight led. Increased sharing of data and information to benefit citizens is integral to achieving this.

“The Information Sharing Gateway has been a key part of this important strategic agenda by not only enabling organisations in GM to work consistently and transparently in capturing the required information governance arrangements in relation to information sharing but also in the providing the opportunity for analysis of management information about where data flows across GM.”

Aaron Cummins, Chief Executive, UHMBT, said: “The ISG system now means that data is able to flow between organisations where there is a justified purpose.  This allows a much more seamless delivery of care and provides clinicians with complete and up-to-date information.”

You can find out more about the ISG at https://www.informationsharinggateway.org.uk/

A new Analytical Command Centre has been created at the Trust’s Royal Lancaster Infirmary site that is helping staff to improve patient management, care and experience.

The command centre has been designed to work in a similar way to airport Air Traffic Control and displays live information about patients throughout their hospital stay, from incoming patients travelling via ambulance to patients waiting for discharge home.

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT) holds patient flow meetings every two hours and the new Analytic Command Centre will help teams to better analyse the emergency care setting and patient flow in and out of the hospital.

The new screens show live information including:

Which patients are due for discharge and themes of why there may be delays
The performance in the Emergency Departments (ED) which allows staff to see the status of ambulances, the number of walk-ins and if there has been a surge in patients
The amount of admissions to hospital through outpatient appointments and departments such as the Ambulatory Care Unit
The current bed state across the Trust which helps teams to manage the demand for beds across the hospital and ease the amount of patients in ED.
Stuart Hosking-Durn, Head of Resilience and Patient Flow for UHMBT, said: “Our great colleagues from the Informatics Team have given us the ability to have live information fed into the control room which will greatly improve our ability to manage patient flow, patient safety and the overall effectiveness of the services we offer to our patients.”

Rob O’Neill, Head of Information, UHMBT, added: “We’ve co-designed the solution with our clinical and operational colleagues and feedback tells us we’ve got a solution that’s making a positive impact to patient care. We’re attracting national and international interest and are looking forward to collaborating with other care systems to continue to innovate and support more efficient and safer care.”

Foluke Ajayi, Chief Operating Officer, UHMBT, said: “We are delighted to be able to invest in the new Analytic Command Centre and we welcome this new way of working at the Trust which will improve patients’ experience of our hospitals.”

You can find out more about our command centre at https://twitter.com/i/status/1073569841544642571

‹ Furness General Hospital welcomes the sound of music to Intensive Care UnitUHMBT to crown its Health Heroes ›
Tagged with: Analytic Command Centre, Featured, Foluke Ajayi, Patient Flow, Rob O’Neill, Stuart Hosking-Durn, UHMBT
Posted in General News

An increasing number of patients are getting treatment more quickly and many do not need to travel to hospital for an outpatient appointment thanks to Advice and Guidance.

The locally-developed system enables GPs to have a secure electronic ‘conversation’ with a hospital specialist. This enables them to obtain advice for individual patients, without the need to refer them to hospital.

From January 2018 – December 2018, nearly 10,000 ‘conversations’ took place between GPs and hospital specialists via the service with 71% of cases resulting in having their treatment changed by their GP.

Dr Marwan Bukhari, Consultant Rheumatologist at University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, who uses the Advice and Guidance Service to offer advice to GPs, said: “This has been a service that has enabled the quick communication between primary and secondary care and enabled decisions about patient care to be made in a timely manner with reduction in waiting and travel time. It has also provided an educational resource for the GP’s and potentially reduced the number of referrals into the service in addition to allowing those referred to have had appropriate investigations prior to being seen, speeding up the diagnostic process.”

Dr William Lumb, a GP in Sedbergh and Chief Clinical Information Officer for Bay Health and Care Partners, said: “This progress is wonderful to see and will directly improve patient care which is what we are all about. Having a digitally mature hospital is an essential component of our bay wide approach where we meld electronic record sharing, navigation and patient facing apps into a single integrated solution of which we are justifiably proud. Real patients are benefiting on a daily basis-so digital health does matter in Morecambe Bay.”

The scheme was introduced as a pilot in Garstang in 2014 as part of Better Care Together and is now available across the Morecambe Bay area. It has expanded since its launch to cover 50 specialties areas including Rheumatology, Radiology, Diabetic Medicine and Endocrinology and Trauma and Orthopaedics.

Bay Health and Care Partners continue to introduce and support new models of care across Morecambe Bay to improve the way people receive health and care services within south Cumbria and North Lancashire. These new models of care developed over the last five years are integral in the delivery and implementation of the Better Care Together Strategy.

The innovative and imaginative use of technology to improve patient care by University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay Trust (UHMBT) has been featured by the Chief Medical Officer in her annual report as an example that healthcare providers should aspire to.

UHMBT uses a Lorenzo Electronic Patient Record system from the time that a patient enters the hospital until they are discharged back home.

Colin Brown, Chief Clinical Information Officer, UHMBT, said: “The pace and scale of digital change, led by our clinicians, nurses and IT team in recent years has been staggering.

“The Electronic Patient Record system is a fantastic tool to support the triage of our patients across many areas of our hospitals. It means that patients are treated more quickly and safely and it also reduces the number of patients waiting in our emergency departments.”

Other examples of staff using new IT for patient care include nurses carrying out ward rounds using iPods, and midwives using laptops to remotely access patient records when they are visiting women in the community.

Over 122,333 patient meals have been ordered at the Royal Lancaster Infirmary and Furness General Hospital via tablet computers thanks to an electronic eMeals system. The old paper processes could take ward staff up to an hour and a half to complete. This means that staffs on the wards have more time to spend on patient care and the system has reduced food wastage by 45%.

An innovative online system called STRATA has also helped to ease the movement of patients around the local healthcare system, for example the discharge of patients from UHMBT’s hospitals into community health and care services.

Community staff in South Cumbria and North Lancashire are also now delivering better integrated care thanks to the Emis web electronic record system which gives them the ability to book appointments for patients across different organisations.

The iPlato myGP app allows patients to book appointments with their GP practice and order prescriptions online.

An Advice and Guidance service enables GPs to access specialist advice from colleagues working in hospitals and enables patients to be seen more quickly and not have to travel to hospital for their care.

Staff using the Electronic Patient Record System access 250 GP records every day, and in 2017 100,000 letters and documents were sent electronically to GPs.

Dr William Lumb, a GP in Sedbergh and Chief Clinical Information Officer for Bay Health and Care Partners, said: “This progress is wonderful to see and will directly improve patient care which is what we are all about. Having a digitally mature hospital is an essential component of our bay wide approach where we meld electronic record sharing, navigation and patient facing apps into a single integrated solution of which we are justifiably proud. Real patients are benefiting on a daily basis-so digital health does matter in Morecambe Bay.”

Colin Brown added: “Technology really is revolutionising the way staff are working, strengthening partnerships between health and care organisations and giving patients a better experience of local healthcare.”